XXVI International Symposium
Paths of Russia. Narodniks and Populists
September 27-28, 2019
Live Streaming
Paths of Russia. Narodniks and Populists
The international interdisciplinary symposium Paths of Russia, jointly organized by MSSES and RANEPA, will take place in Moscow on September 27-28, 2019. Sessions of the symposium are supported by Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung, Friedrich Naumann Stiftung, and other partners. The Plenary Session will be opened by Teodor Shanin, founder and President of MSSES.

The fragility of the international political landscape and liberal democracies all over the worldhas been demonstrated in recent years. The People returns to the stage across the globe, both as an actor behind the new mass movements and as the passive source of legitimacy for nationalist leaders implementing military interventions and resisting international institutions. This outcome is ambiguous: while some cherish hopes for the renewal of democracy, others fear reckless populists and their threats to dismantle individual rights and liberties.

The Russian political tradition of populism, narodniks, provides an instructive example of the democratic activation of the masses. It generated a profound reflection on the structural and moral relationships between the people and intellectuals. Nowadays, the renewal of populism challenges intellectuals in Russia, Europe, andin both North and Latin America to reconsider their political function. Should they defend the basic political institutions alongside the elites? Or rather, should they become the voice of the people?
The awakening of the people in nation-states is also troubling the dominant projects of international and global integration. Almost all global institutions are experiencing a profound crisis of legitimacy of their economic, cultural, and humanitarian missions. Russia, like many other countries, is witnessing how isolationist reactions emerge from the resistance to neocolonialism and the fear of losing its national identity. Rising inequalities in the world and increasingly dependent economies of the so-called 'developing countries' make us rethink the nature of imperialism and to reread its critics. Building a new internationalist project requires fresh intellectual interventions.

What can we expect from populist movements across the globe? What is the place of the people in contemporary politics, and how can intellectuals shape it? Is there a chance of building new internationalist projects using the energy of populist protests? What are the boundaries of the people, and the key modes of inclusion and exclusion? These questions will be the topics of debate during this symposium.

Program
September 27, RANEPA, building 5
9:30 – 10:00 Registration of participants (room 325)

10:00 – 10:30 Opening of the conference. Greeting words Theodor Shanin, Sergey Zuev, Vasily Zharkov, Kersten Kaiser, Julius von Freytag-Loringhoven, Irina Prokhorova

10:30 – 13:30 Keynote Speakers
Chair – Vasily Zharkov (MSSES)

Julius von Freytag-Loringhoven (Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom) Ralf Dahrendorf and "Eight Remarks on Populism"
Francisco Panizza (London School of economics) Towards a Conceptualisation of Populist Rights
Carlos de la Torre (University of Florida) Populism in Power and as a Regime
Sergio Schneider (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul) Uncertainty, Crisis and Social Changes - Brazil in Times of Neopopulism

13:30 – 14:30 Lunch

14:30 – 19:30 Workshop "Populism Across the Borders: From Cases to Theory"(room 325, in English, synchronous interpretation)
The workshop is held by Greg Yudin (MSSES)

This workshop brings together different national perspectives on populist politics to refine the conceptual apparatus. What are the implications for democracy from various ramifications of populism in different national contexts? What are the differences between populist parties in Western and Eastern Europe and can they be justly subsumed under the same label? Should plebiscitarian tendencies manifested in many countries in both East and West be understood as instantiations of populism? Does the experience of populists in power in Latin America justify the idea of populist regime – or rather populism can only be properly grasped as political logic and political movement? What are the meaningful differences between the right-wing and left-wing populist politics across Europe and what do the examples of Venezuela or Ecuador tell about the possibility of mutation of the left-wing populism?

The workshop is supported by Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom.

14:30 – 16:30 Session 1. Chair – Greg Yudin (MSSES)

Alexandra Panzarelli (The New School University) "Chavez Goes to Heaven and the PSUV Goes to Hell": Populism and Messianism in post-Chavez Venezuela
Tatiana Vorozheikina (independent researcher) The Everlasting Populism: Latin America between 20th and 21st centuries
Ilya Matveev (North-Western Institute of Management RANEPA) The Art of Drawing a Line: Populism and Nationalism in Russian Politics
Dorottya Szikra (Hungarian Academy of Sciences) Populist Governance, Democratic Down-sliding and the Welfare State. A Comparative Overview of Russia, Turkey and Hungary

16:30 – 17:00 Coffee break

17:00 – 19:30 Session 2. Chair – Alexandra Panzarelli (The New School)
Nikolay Babich (Federal Center of Theoretical and Applied Sociology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "For Everything Good and Opposed to Everything Bad": Populism as a Manifestation of the Modularity of Political Consciousness
Sergei Koretko (European University at Saint Petersburg) What is to be done with populism? The Mixed Constitution in Classical Republicanism and Alain Badiou's Metapolitics
Stephan Merl (Bielefeld University) The Rise of Populism – Crisis of Democracy? A Comparative View from a Historical Perspective
Greg Yudin (MSSES) Plebiscitarianism vs. Populism: Case of Russia

14:30 – 20:00 Parallel Sessions
16:30 –17:00 Coffee break

"The people" as a concept in civil religions of modernity: between the necessity and the impossibility (room 419, in Russian)
Chairs – Oleg Kildushov (Center for Fundamental Sociology NRU HSE) , Alexander Marey ("Philosophy. The HSE journal"), Andrey Teslya (Institute of humanitites Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University)The session is supported by the Center for Fundamental Sociology NRU HSE and the journal "Sociological Review"

"Small deed theory: history and our times" (room 121, in Russian)
Chairs –Theodor Shanin (MSSES), Alexander Nikulin (Center for Agrarian Studies RANEPA, "The journal of peasant studies")The session is supported by Rosa Luxemburg Foundation.

"Between education and co-authorship. Social Research in public space" (room 208, in Russian)Chairs – Mikhail Rozhansky (Center for social research – Irkutsk), Dmitriy Sporov ("Oral history" Foundation)

The session is supported by Mikhail Prokhorov Foundation
September 28, RANEPA, building 5
10:00 – 13:00 Parallel Sessions

11:30 – 12:00 Coffee break

"Small deed theory: history and our times" (room 121, in Russian)
Chairs – Theodor Shanin (MSSES), Alexander Nikulin (Center for Agrarian Studies RANEPA, "The journal of peasant studies")
The session is supported by Rosa Luxemburg Foundation.

"Between education and co-authorship. Social Research in public space" (room 208, in Russian)
Chairs – Mikhail Rozhansky (Center for social research – Irkutsk), Dmitriy Sporov ("Oral history" Foundation)
The session is supported by Mikhail Prokhorov Foundation

"Populism in an organization and the subjective well-being of the employees: phenomena and interconnections" (room 210, in Russian)
Chairs – Veronika Kabalina (NRU HSE), Evgeny Morgunov (MSSES)

"The people" as a concept in civil religions of modernity: between the necessity and the impossibility (room 419, in Russian)
Chairs – Oleg Kildushov (Center for Fundamental Sociology NRU HSE) , Alexander Marey ("Philosophy. The HSE journal"), Andrey Teslya (Institute of humanitites Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University)
The session is supported by the Center for Fundamental Sociology NRU HSE and the journal "Sociological Review"

13.00 – 14.00 LUNCH

14.00 – 16.30 What does "imperialism" mean? Rosa Luxemburg and "The Accumulation of Capital" today. (room 325, in English, synchronous interpretation)
Chairs – Ilya Budraitskis (MSSES), Ilya Konovalov (NRU HSE)

The hundredth anniversary of the tragic death of Rosa Luxembourg presents an important opportunity to reconsider her theoretical legacy. The theory of imperialism, proposed by Luxembourg in fundamental work "The Accumulation of Capital", had a huge impact on the social and economic progressive thought of the twentieth century. The global growth of social inequality, the spread of military conflicts and the deepening dependence of the so-called "developing countries" have brought up to date the debate on imperialism and the grounds for its criticism. However, what can this criticism take from Luxembourg's legacy? How pertinent is her well known thesis that capitalism constantly appropriates non-capitalist elements external to it? What role does militarism and military production play in stabilizing capitalism? Can the conception of Luxembourg serve as a basis for a complex and non-linear concept of capitalist development, which take into account the simultaneous coexistence of different socio-economic forms? Finally, what place should the legacy of Rosa Luxemburg occupy in the new internationalist response to the challenges of the present?
The session is supported by Rosa Luxemburg Foundation.

Alex Callinicos (King's College London) Rosa Luxemburg's Critique of Capitalism and Contemporary Imperialism
Ingo Schmidt (Athabasca University) Rosa Luxemburg: A Theoretical Guide to the Political Economy of Capitalism from its Early Days to the Present
Eric Toussaint (Committee for the Abolition of Illegitimate Debt) Rosa Luxemburg and the Debt as an Imperialist Tool. The Case of Egypt, China, etc

17.00 – 19.00 Round table "Populism and the Postsoviet Transformation of Russia" (room 325, Russian/English synchronous interpretation)
Supported by the Gorbachev Foundation
Moderated by Olga Zdravomyslova (The Gorbachev Foundation), Andrey Ryabov (Institute of World Economy and International Relations)

The Perestroika could be viewed as historical chance to constitute the rule of the people in Russia. The First Congress of People's Deputies of the Soviet Union (May, 25 – June, 8 1989) that launched the modern Russian parliamentarianism signified such a possibility. Various contradictions created an environment favorable to populism which prevailed in the early period of Boris Yeltsin's politics. Nevertheless when Yeltsin turned into a leader of a radical democratic opposition to Perestroika his features of a populist faded away. Neither in Russia nor in any other former Soviet Republic (with the noticeable exception of Belarus) populism played a decisive role. Radical reforms of the 90s did not produce any pronounced demand for the populism in the Russian society. The majority of the most people struggled to survive, while a more well-situated minority bided on the individual adaptation models.
However at the beginning of the XXI century the populist technologies came into play. Does this lead to the emergence of populist politicians? What are the specifics of a contemporary Russian populism (beyond technologies)? What explanation can be found for the combination of populism with ideology and practice of "new elitism"? And what is the ideological justification of the division of the society into classes? What conditions could bring about the appearance of strong populist key players in Russia?

REGISTRATION
For registration please send an email to alexandrazapolski@gmail.com with folowing information: your name, surname, citizenship, job-position, pasport-number till September, 24
Organizers
Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences
Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration
Partners
Contacts
Vernadskogo Pr., 82, build.5
Contacts
Marina Pugacgeva
8-916-500-21-72 puma7@yandex.ru

Alexandra Zapolskaya
alexandrazapolski@gmail.com